Monks pour time, heart into baked goods

CHRISTOVAL, Texas — Tucked in the West Texas countryside and purposefully secluded from the rest of the world, Mount Carmel Hermitage has sat overlooking Christoval for almost 25 years.

The monastery, which was founded by Father Fabian Maria Rosette, began as a humble hut in 1991. Today it has a gift shop, a renovated chapel, several buildings and is home to Father Fabian and several brothers of his Carmelite order — as well as an unexpectedly professional, restaurant-style kitchen,

Inside the kitchen, three monks worked studiously in silence this week, peeling apples and stirring flour with aromatic spices, preparing for their annual bake sale at this weekend’s Christmas at Old Fort Concho.

“It’s a tradition to the early ages for monks to support themselves by the work that they do with their hands, so that’s how we started the bakery,” Brother John David said. “Here we all work for the same pay: Our reward is in heaven. We have great rewards in heaven.”

The sprawling kitchen is filled with professional-grade stainless steel appliances, has its own brick-fired pizza oven and would be well-suited for a restaurant — let alone for a few monks baking bread and making jam and jellies several months out of the year. The kitchen cost an estimated $250,000, donated by a woman from Christoval, Father Fabian said.

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Credit: Kimberley Meyer Brother John David slides rolls of baked biscotti onto cooling racks in 2012 at the Mount Carmel Hermitage in Christoval. In addition to their regular daily prayer commitments, the monks spend much of their time preparing baked goods to sell at Christmas at Old Fort Concho and elsewhere to support the hermitage.

The hermits wake up about 3 a.m. every day and during the holiday season spend much of their day in the kitchen, baking sweets to sell in their gift shop, at local events and online.

“We feel as though this is becoming our income for our budget throughout the year,” said Brother David, who shadows the younger monks during the baking process. “All our products are so good that they just sell by themselves.”

Brother David said one of the first baked goods the monks sold was an apple walnut bread whose recipe was given to Father Fabian by some nuns. Their most popular bread, however, is the pumpkin pecan. Brother David said even though he gives out the recipe for it, people want the bread to come from the hermitage because it is blessed.

“The recipe is right there, but people say, ‘We want y’all to do it,’ ” Brother David said, chuckling loudly.

The hermits try to cook up something new each year to expand their products, and this year they have a pomegranate jelly, Brother David said. He said he also tries to follow trends, catering to people’s interests.

“Everybody likes it hot with heat,” Brother David said. “So we started doing a habanero apricot jam. Everybody loves it. And we also have jalapeño honey, and people are going crazy with that.”

Profits generated through sales are divided across 12 months to cover bills, unexpected expenses and sometimes construction.

The money might help Father Fabian get closer to his current goal: building a church in the center of the hermitage, where there is now just open space.

In the hermitage’s humble beginnings, Father Fabian built the original hut with just the help of Brother David.

“He talked about having a house of prayers,” Brother David said. “I didn’t know much about what he was talking about because this was foreign to me. But since I was a good friend of his, I would come out and help him because I used to be a carpenter.”

Three years later, Brother David, 55, said he liked the lifestyle at the hermitage so much he left modernity and joined the sanctuary permanently.

Father Fabian said after serving as a priest for 10 years, he felt a calling to create a place of worship.

“I really wanted to go into the desert and be alone with God,” he said.

Creating the hermitage was his dream, but it was not easy for him to build it, Father Fabian said. He faced misunderstandings and persecution and struggled to make it the way it is today, he said.

“I can die today, I am happy,” Father Fabian said. “This is my dream come true. I can die at peace and say at least I did what I was called to do.

“Everything else is in the hands of God.”

Find the original story at gosanangelo.com.

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